Menu

Tree trimming web banner 1280x366 March 2022.png

Bad things can happen when you don’t have your trees trimmed by a professional contractor to at least 5 metres away from powerlines.

Did you know?

Power interruptions, fires and serious accidents can happen when trees or branches touch powerlines. Sometimes trees can even become live with electricity when they come into contact with powerlines, which poses a serious safety risk. 

So, it's important to always...

  • When do trees need to be trimmed?

    High winds and stormy weather can blow branches and debris into powerlines – so trees need to be trimmed if they are too close to powerlines. 

  • How far away from a powerline should trees be trimmed?

    Horizon Power crews regularly inspect powerlines to check whether any vegetation is growing too close.  As a general rule, trees should be no closer than five metres to powerlines. For the minimal clearance figure for your region please contact your local Horizon Power office. 

    Figure 1: Clearance Zones for Overhead Power Lines

    Tree clearance zone illustration 2.png

     

    Figure 2: Vegetation Clearance Zones for LV ABC

    Tree clearance zone illustration 1.png

  • Who should trim trees?
    When the trees at your home need to be trimmed, don’t do it yourself.

    When the trees at your home need to be trimmed, don’t do it yourself.

    We recommend that you hire a professional tree contractor as they have the correct training and experience to carry out the work. Check with your local council for trusted tree trimming contractors in your area or visit the WA Tree Guild to search for contractors.

  • Who is responsible for which trees?

    If the tree is on...

     

    It is the resident’s responsibility to trim trees on private property, even if they are not the home owner.

    You may want to check if this is covered in your rental agreement.

    Horizon Power works with local councils to carry out vegetation management programs on urban street verges and road reserves. As a guide, the trees coloured orange in the diagram below are the responsibility of the occupier of Property A; those coloured green are the responsibility of the occupier of Property B. The tree planted on the verge (blue coloured tree) is the responsibility of the local council.  

    hopopw0075_mel_v25.jpg

What about underground power?

Whether you’re landscaping your backyard or taking on heavier work, you need to be aware of your underground networks and how to stay safe.

Find out more
Safety tips for your home

Follow these simple tips to help protect your household from the dangers of electricity.

Learn more

Horizon Power acknowledges the Traditional Custodians throughout Western Australia and their continuing connection to the land, waters and community. We pay our respects to all members of the Aboriginal communities and their cultures; and to Elders past, present and emerging.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people are advised that this website may contain images, names or voices of deceased people.